TEACHING

Spring 2020

SOC 1010: Introductory Sociology

  • Instructor: Rose Buckelew
  • Sections taught: Fr 9-9:50AM; 2-2:50PM; 3-3:50PM
  • The goal of this course is to introduce students to contemporary sociology. While this may seem like a simple and straightforward goal, it is actually rather ambitious. Sociology is a broad field that encompasses a multiplicity of methods and theories. Further, sociological work takes on many different forms and subjects. For these reasons, this course will not attempt to cover the breadth or the entirety of sociology. Instead, this course will prepare students to think like a sociologist. (the course description is credited to Professor Rose Buckelew.)

Fall 2019

SOC 2230: Criminology

  • Instructor: Rose Buckelew
  • Sections taught: Fr 12-12:50PM; 1-1:50PM; 2-2:50PM
  • By the end of this course, students should be able to:

1. Explain key concepts related to crime, criminal justice, and race, class, and gender.

2. Relate America’s history of social control and punishment to current crime policies and practices.

3. Critically interrogate news, policies, and reform efforts related to crime.

4. Define and illustrate how crime is socially and historically constructed.

5. Write reflectively on how your social position shapes your experiences with crime, punishment, and safety.

(the course description is credited to Professor Rose Buckelew.)

Spring 2019

SOC 1010: Introductory Sociology

  • Instructor: Rose Buckelew
  • Sections taught: Th 8-8:50AM; 9-9:50AM; 1-1:50PM
  • This course will prepare students to think like a sociologist. What sorts of questions do sociologists ask? What methods do they employ? What debates do they engage in? What challenges do they face? What strengths can they contribute to our pursuit of knowledge? These are the sorts of questions students in this course will ask and answer. (the course description is credited to Professor Rose Buckelew.)

Fall 2018

SOC 2230: Criminology

  • Instructor: Fiona Greenland
  • Sections taught: Fr 8-8:50AM; 12-12:50PM; 2-2:50PM
  • By the end of the course, students should be able to:
  1. Identify the major elements of criminological theory (classical, positivist, criminogenic, feminist).
  2. List the main institutional components of the criminal justice system.
  3. Critically analyze mainstream media stories about crime, able to identify sources of evidence, recurring themes, and the accuracy of common claims.
  4. Name the major crime data sources and evaluate their strengths and weaknesses.

(the course description is credited to Professor Fiona Greenland.)

Fall 2014 ~ Spring 2016 (4 semesters)

PS 1005 & 1006: Introductory Political Science 政治學一二

  • Instructor: Chang-Ling Huang(黃長玲)
  • [政治學一]的課程內容是讓修課同學對於政治學的基本概念諸如國家形成、政治行為、以及政治體制有所了解。[政治學二]的課程內容則是討論國家或政治行為在經濟、社會及國際等面向所出現的形態,以及所造成的影響。 (the course description is credited to Professor Chang-Ling Huang.)